Trace element research using coniferous forest soil/litter microcosms
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Trace element research using coniferous forest soil/litter microcosms

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Published by Corvallis Environmental Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Available to the public through the National Technical Information Service in Corvallis, Springfield, Va .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Trace elements.,
  • Soils -- Trace elements content.,
  • Microcosm and macrocosm.,
  • Forest soils.,
  • Forest litter -- Biodegradation.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby B. Lighthart, H. Bond, and M. Ricard.
SeriesResearch reporting series. 3. Ecological research -- EPA-600/3-77-091., Research reporting series -- EPA-600/3-77-091.
ContributionsBond, H., Ricard, M., Corvallis Environmental Research Laboratory., Corvallis Environmental Research Laboratory. Terrestrial Ecology Branch.
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, 78 p. :
Number of Pages78
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17822931M

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Trophic fractionation of 13 C has been found to vary between À& (Spence and Rosenheim, ) and 1& (DeNiro and Epstein, ). However, . Journal of Applied Ecol Gardiner A. S. () The reputation of birch for soil improvement. Forestry Commission Research and Devel- opment Paper No. 67, London. Haimi J. and Boucelham M. () Influence of a litter feeding earthworm, Lumbricus rubellus, on soil processes in a simulated coniferous forest floor. Pedobiologia 35 Cited by: (3) The overall impact of macroarthropods on microbial respiration in litter or soil-litter microcosms can be positive or negative; the results vary depending on animal abundance and litter type Author: Jean-Francois DAVID. Abstract. The Mn, Zn and Cu contents of litter, soil fauna and soil in Pinus koraiensis and mixed broad-leaved forest in Liangshui Nature Reserve of Xiaoxing’an Mountains were analyzed in this paper, results showed that the tested microelement contents in the litter, soil fauna and soil followed the order: Mn>Zn>Cu, but varied with environmental components, for Mn the order is soil>litter Author: LI Jinxia, Yin Xiuqin, Dong Weihua.

  Microbial biomass C and N, and activities related to C and N cycles, were compared in needle and leaf litter, and in the uppermost 10 cm of soil under the litter layer in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies L.) and silver birch (Betula pendula L.) stands, planted on originally similar field afforestation sites 23–24 years by: forest species composition and as site preparation prior to planting, generates questions regarding the direct and indirect effects on the arthropod community at the soil–litter interface. Losses to the arthropod community could hinder the rate of decomposition and nutrient cycling on the forest floor, leading to decreases in Size: KB. Microcosms were created to simulate the forest environment while exerting control on temperatures and soil humidity. This study will focus on evaluating the relative impacts of plant material, climate and microbial communities during the different stages of the decomposition process both in the field and under controlled by: 7. mineral soil. Litter exclusion To determine the contribution of LR to SR, we removed the Oi and Oe horizons by hand on 1 July SR was measured in this exact area prior to litter removal, with rates similar to those from other plots (DeForest et al. ). Litter was removed from a 4 m2 area and the fine litterCited by: